Peer reviewed articles

International

Peer reviewed articles concerning current relating to contemporary refugee movements at the international level

Peer reviewed articles

The information below presents peer reviewed articles concerning current understanding relating to contemporary refugee movements internationally.  Short descriptions of each article are provided, as are links and/or PDF files. The articles below are arranged by date of publication.    
Years: 2006-2016

 

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Meeting the Health Literacy Needs of Immigrant Populations

Peer reviewed articles

Immigrant populations are vulnerable to serious health disparities, with many  immigrants experiencing significantly worse health outcomes, such as higher rates of morbidity and mortality, than other segments of society. Immigrants disproportionately suffer from heart attacks, cancer, diabetes, strokes, HIV/AIDS, and many other serious diseases.

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Common mental health problems in immigrants and refugees: general approach in primary care

Peer reviewed articles

The authors searched and compiled literature on prevalence and risk factors for common mental health problems related to migration, the effect of cultural influences on health and illness, and clinical strategies to improve mental health care for immigrants and refugees.

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Migration Circumstances, Psychological Distress, and Self-Rated Physical Health for Latino Immigrants in the United States

Peer reviewed articles

This article determines the impact of premigration circumstances on postmigration  psychological distress and self-rated physical health among Latino immigrants.

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Children Left Behind: How to Mitigate the Effects and Facilitate Emotional and Psychosocial Development, Child Abuse & Neglect

Peer reviewed articles

Recommendations to raise an awareness of the need to prevent children from being  in situations of de facto abandonment or from experiencing decreased life chances and opportunity because of parental absence.

 

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Coping, acculturation, and psychological adaptation among migrants

Peer reviewed articles

A comprehensive review of what we currently know about the relationship between coping behavior and acculturation experience for individuals undergoing cultural  changes has not yet been undertaken. Hence, the current article aims to compile, review, and examine cumulative cross-cultural psychological research that sheds light on the relationships among coping, acculturation, and psychological and mental health outcomes for migrants.

Factors Affecting Migrant Attitudes Towards Seeking Psychological Help

Peer reviewed articles

Research indicates that service utilization rates in migrant groups are low, although levels of distress appear high when compared with host populations. This paper systematically reviews quantitative and qualitative literature on factors associated with attitudes toward seeking psychological help among working age migrants.

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Mental health literacy of resettled Iraqi refugees in Australia

Peer reviewed articles

Resettled refugees are a particularly vulnerable group. They have very high levels of mental health problems, in particular, trauma-related disorders, but very low  uptake of mental health care. Evidence suggests that poor “mental health literacy”, namely, poor knowledge and understanding of the nature and treatment of mental health problems is a major factor in low or inappropriate treatment-seeking among individuals with mental health problems.

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Health-Promoting Lifestyle Behaviors and Psychological Status Among Arabs and Koreans in the United Arab Emirates

Peer reviewed articles

Cultural variations among ethnic groups may differentially influence health and  health behavior. We explored and compared health-promoting lifestyle behaviors and psychological status, including depression, anxiety, and stress, among Korean migrants (n=117) and Arab nationals (n=103) in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). Pender's Health Promotion Model guided this research.

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Social Determinants of Immigrant Women’s Mental Health

Peer reviewed articles

Migration is a population movement with enormous challenges for immigrant women that influence their mental health. Mental health is a social issue and its determinants need to be recognized for health policy making. This paper reviews and consolidates findings from the existing literature on social determinants of immigrant women’s mental health within a socioecological framework.

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Premigration and post-migration factors associated with mental health in humanitarian migrants in Australia

Peer reviewed articles

The process of becoming a humanitarian migrant is potentially damaging to mental health. We examined the association between pre-migration and post-migration potentially traumatic events and stressors and mental health, and assessed the moderating effect of post-migration stressors in humanitarian migrants in Australia.

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